Journal of Medical Internet Research


Impact Factor 5.03

Scope

The "Journal of Medical Internet Research" (JMIR; ISSN 1438-8871, Medline-abbreviation: J Med Internet Res), founded in 1999, is a leading health informatics and health services/health policy journal (ranked first by Impact Factor in these disciplines) focussing on emerging technologies in health, medicine, and biomedical research. JMIR was the first open access journal covering health informatics, and the first international scientific peer-reviewed journal on all aspects of research, information and communication in the healthcare field using Internet and Internet-related technologies; a broad field, which is nowadays called "eHealth" [see also What is eHealth and What is eHealth (2)], which includes mHealth (mobile health). This field also has significant overlaps with what is called "consumer health informatics", health 2.0/medicine 2.0, or participatory medicine. This focus makes JMIR unique among other medical or medical informatics journals, which tend to focus on clinical informatics or clinical applications. As eHealth/mHealth is a highly interdisciplinary field we are not only inviting research papers from the medical sciences, but also from the computer, behavioral, social and communication sciences, psychology, library sciences, informatics, human-computer interaction studies, and related fields.

The term "Internet" is used in its broadest sense, so we are also interested in studies and applications of mobile technologies and social media (which often use the Internet as an underlying technology) or even the "Internet of things" (e.g. connected home appliances, domotics, etc). Manuscripts are invited which deal for example with:

  • studies evaluating the impact of Internet/social media use or specific eHealth/mHealth interventions on individual health-related or social outcomes
  • evaluations and implementations of innovative mhealth (mobile health) applications, social media apps, ubiquitous computing, or innovative and emerging technologies in health
  • descriptions of the design and impact of Internet and mobile applications and websites or social media for consumers/patients or medical professionals
  • use of the Internet, social media and mhealth in the context of clinical information and communication, including telemedicine
  • use of the Internet, social media, and mhealth in medical research and the basic sciences such as molecular biology or chemistry (e.g. bioinformatics, online factual databases)
  • medical information management and librarian sciences
  • e-learning and knowledge translation, online-courses, social media, web-based and mobile programs for undergraduate and continuing education,
  • eHealth/mHealth and social media applications for public health and population health technology (disease monitoring, teleprevention, teleepidemiology)
  • evidence-based medicine and the Internet and mhealth (e.g. online development or dissemination of clinical guidelines, measuring agreement about management of a given clinical problem among physicians, etc.)
  • the impact of eHealth/mHealth/pHealth/iHealth, social media, the Internet, or health care technologies on public health, the health care system and policy
  • methodological aspects of doing Internet/mhealth/social media research, e.g. methodology of web-based surveys
  • design and validation of novel web-based instruments
  • ecological momentary assessment, sensors, mobile technologies for gathering and analyzing data in real-time
  • analysis of e-communities, social media communities, or virtual social networks
  • comparisons of effectiveness of health communication and information on the Internet/mHealth/social media compared with other methods of health communication,
  • effects of the Internet/mhealth/social media and information/communication technology on the patient-physician relationship and impact on public health, e.g. the studies investigating how the patient-physician relationship changes as a result of the new ways of getting medical information
  • ethical and legal problems as well as cross-border and cross-cultural issues of eHealth/mHealth
  • systematic studies examining the quality of medical information available in various online venues
  • methods of evaluation, quality assessment and improvement of Internet information or eHealth applications
  • proposals for standards in the field of medical publishing on the Internet, including self-regulation issues, policies and guidelines to provide reliable healthcare information
  • results and methodological aspects of Internet-based and social media studies, including medical surveys, psychological tests, quality-of-life studies, gathering and/or disseminating epidemiological data, use of the Internet/mobile apps/social media for clinical studies (e-trials), drug reaction reporting and surveillance systems etc.
  • electronic medical publishing, Open Access publishing, altmetrics, and use of the Internet or social media for scholarly publishing (e.g. collaborative peer review)
  • information needs of patients, consumers and health professionals, including studies evaluating search and retrieval behavior of patients
  • web-based studies, e.g. online psychological experiments
  • evaluations of mhealth (mobile) applications, as well as ambient / ubiquitous computing approaches, sensors, domotics, and other cutting edge technologies
  • personal health records, patient portals, consumer health informatics applications
  • behavior change technologies
  • Reviews, viewpoint papers and commentaries touching on the issues and themes listed above are also welcome, but should be grounded in data and/or a thorough literature review

In addition, the Journal will occasionally publish original research, reviews and tutorials on more generic, related topics such as:

  • Internet standards
  • cybermetrics
  • security and confidentiality issues
  • Internet demographics
  • social impact of the Internet
  • digital imaging and multimedia
  • health care records
  • high-speed networks
  • telecommunication
  • electronic publishing
  • software development

In order to be considered for JMIR, clinical informatics papers should have a clear connections to the major themes in this journal of consumer/patient empowerment and participatory healthcare, and/or evaluate the use of mobile/Internet-based/emerging technologies.Other clinical informatics studies with no relationship to consumer health informatics, or more technical papers can still be submitted and be peer-reviewed within JMIR, but are likely to be transferred to other JMIR sister journals, most notably the Interactive Journal of Medical Research (i-JMR, a general medical journal with focus on innovation), JMIR mHealth and uHealth, JMIR Medical Informatics, or JMIR Human Factors (in prep.). Formative work such as usability studies, pilot studies, proposals and protocols are transferred to JMIR Research Protocols. Papers with focus on games in health or gamification aspects of apps and theoretical issues/commentary on gaming are now primarily published in / transferred to JMIR Serious Games.

Submitted manuscripts are subject to a rigorous but speedy peer review process. Starting in 2012, we aim for a standard review time of less than 2 months, and a fast-tracked review time of 3 weeks (see Current Statistics, in particular 1.4 Time from submission to initial decision).

The review process is designed to help authors to improve their manuscripts by giving them constructive comments on how to improve their paper, and to publish only those articles which comply to general quality criteria of a scholarly paper, especially originality, clarity, references to related work and validity of results and conclusions.

Journal Format

The Journal of Medical Internet Research publishes articles "continuously," i.e. articles are published online as soon as they are available (peer-reviewed and copy-edited). Since 2013, the journal publishes daily (weekdays only).

The Journal collates articles into archival "issues" (before 2012, about 4 issues per year; since 2012 6 issues per year, since 2013 12 issues per year) and "volumes" (one per year).

The journal is entirely free, subscription is not necessary. However, we encourage authors and readers to support the journal by considering our subscription (membership) scheme where PDF reprints of single articles and "issues" are made available as value-added service.

Recent Articles

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Artificial Intelligence

Despite excellent prediction performance, noninterpretability has undermined the value of applying deep-learning algorithms in clinical practice. To overcome this limitation, attention mechanism has been introduced to clinical research as an explanatory modeling method. However, potential limitations of using this attractive method have not been clarified to clinical researchers. Furthermore, there has been a lack of introductory information explaining attention mechanisms to clinical researchers.

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Infodemiology and Infoveillance

The epidemic of misinformation about COVID-19 transmission, prevention, and treatment has been going on since the start of the pandemic. However, data on the exposure and impact of misinformation is not readily available.

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Artificial Intelligence

In December 2019, COVID-19 broke out in Wuhan, China, leading to national and international disruptions in health care, business, education, transportation, and nearly every aspect of our daily lives. Artificial intelligence (AI) has been leveraged amid the COVID-19 pandemic; however, little is known about its use for supporting public health efforts.

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Ethics, Privacy, and Legal Issues

There is substantial prior research on the perspectives of patients on the use of health information for research. Numerous communication barriers challenge transparency between researchers and data participants in secondary database research (eg, waiver of informed consent and knowledge gaps). Individual concerns and misconceptions challenge the trust in researchers among patients despite efforts to protect data. Technical software used to protect research data can further complicate the public's understanding of research. For example, MiNDFIRL (Minimum Necessary Disclosure For Interactive Record Linkage) is a prototype software that can be used to enhance the confidentiality of data sets by restricting disclosures of identifying information during the record linkage process. However, software, such as MiNDFIRL, which is used to protect data, must overcome the aforementioned communication barriers. One proposed solution is the creation of an interactive web-based frequently asked question (FAQ) template that can be adapted and used to communicate research issues to data subjects.

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New Methods

The status of the data-driven management of cancer care as well as the challenges, opportunities, and recommendations aimed at accelerating the rate of progress in this field are topics of great interest. Two international workshops, one conducted in June 2019 in Cordoba, Spain, and one in October 2019 in Athens, Greece, were organized by four Horizon 2020 (H2020) European Union (EU)–funded projects: BOUNCE, CATCH ITN, DESIREE, and MyPal. The issues covered included patient engagement, knowledge and data-driven decision support systems, patient journey, rehabilitation, personalized diagnosis, trust, assessment of guidelines, and interoperability of information and communication technology (ICT) platforms. A series of recommendations was provided as the complex landscape of data-driven technical innovation in cancer care was portrayed.

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JMIR Theme Issue 2020: COVID-19 Special Issue

The COVID-19 pandemic led to unprecedented mitigation efforts that disrupted the daily lives of millions. Beyond the general health repercussions of the pandemic itself, these measures also present a challenge to the world’s mental health and health care systems. Considering that traditional survey methods are time-consuming and expensive, we need timely and proactive data sources to respond to the rapidly evolving effects of health policy on our population’s mental health. Many people in the United States now use social media platforms such as Twitter to express the most minute details of their daily lives and social relations. This behavior is expected to increase during the COVID-19 pandemic, rendering social media data a rich field to understand personal well-being.

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JMIR Theme Issue 2020: COVID-19 Special Issue

Surveys of the general population can provide crucial information for designing effective nonpharmaceutical interventions to tackle public health emergencies, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet, conducting such surveys can be difficult, especially when timely data collection is required. In this viewpoint paper, we discuss our experiences with using targeted Facebook advertising campaigns to address these difficulties in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic. We describe central advantages, challenges, and practical considerations. This includes a discussion of potential sources of bias and how they can be addressed.

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Quality/Credibility of eHealth Information and Trust Issues

With rapid evolution of the internet and web 2.0 apps, online sources have become one of the main channels for most people to seek food risk information. Thus, it would be compelling to analyze the coverage of online information sources related to biological, chemical, and nutritional food risks, and related safety issues, to understand the type of content that online readers are exposed to, possibly influencing their perceptions.

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Virtual Reality and Virtual Worlds

Falls are a common phenomenon among people aged 65 and older and affect older adults’ health, quality of life, and autonomy. Technology-based intervention programs are designed to prevent the occurrence of falls and their effectiveness often surpasses that of more conventional programs. However, to be effective, these programs must first be accepted by seniors.

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JMIR Theme Issue 2020: COVID-19 Special Issue

The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, has instigated immediate and massive worldwide research efforts. Rapid publication of research data may be desirable but also carries the risk of quality loss.

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